Exhibitions

Laura Grier: PEOPLE WALK BACKWARDS / Dene K’et’a Ditla
The Art Incubator Gallery . October 19 – December 1, 2018
Opening Reception: Friday, October 19, from 7 – 10pm
Harcourt House Artist Run Centre, 3rd floor, 10215 – 112 St, Edmonton

This series of CMYK Screen and Lithograph prints are based on personal stories of growing up as an Indigenous woman. These stories are common among aboriginal people who have had to balance experiences of racism and inherited trauma, with our inherited responsibility to culture and traditions. I see myself always progressing forward, but I tend to walk facing the past. Having been born away from my tradition land, I use printmaking to revitalize my own Deline culture and knowledge. These prints are not only records of my own experiences, but are an example of Indigenous story telling and resilience.


ARRIVALS: Curated by Ociciwan Contemporary Art Collective

Tamara Lee-Anne Cardinal
Dan Cardinal McCartney
Laura Grier
Sarah Houle

June 29 – August 4, 2018

      

Ociciwan Contemporary Art Collective presents Arrivals in collaboration with dc3 Art Projects. This exhibition features the work of four emerging Indigenous artists who are redefining Indigenous contemporary art in Alberta. Tamara Lee-Anne Cardinal, Laura Grier, Dan Cardinal McCartney and Sarah Houle each present new work that represents an aspect of their growing practice.


NextFest 2017

2017/June 1-30/ Roots Building on Whyte, Edmonton AB

Podcast Link:

http://nextfest.org/visual-art-tour-roots-whyte/


Sahtúot’ine: Stories from Deline Elders

2017/ May 4-June 10/ SNAP Gallery, Edmonton AB

The act of storytelling is an act of Indigenous resistance, decolonization, and reclamation. We have a responsibility to hold on to our traditional knowledge. This series of screen prints are stories from the Deline of the Northwest Territories. As a Deline first nation, Laura Grier feels obligated to learn and tell her peoples stories. It is imperative that she preserve and share stories and lessons to demonstrate the continuation of Indigenous culture.

    


2015 NSCAD University Graduation Exhibition

grad

2015/ May 5-7/ Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax NS

Over 100 artworks created by the 2015 NSCAD University graduates will be exhibited throughout the Anna Leonowens and Port Loggia Galleries. This annual event is the largest display of NSCAD undergraduate and graduate works at one time.


EKAGÔHT’E

Laura Grier

2015/ Feb 17-21/ Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax NS

Like “canaries in a coal mine,” the deteriorating health of fish and other wildlife speaks volumes about the need to clean up our waters. These series of Lithograph and Silkscreen prints subtly refers to our current way of life and it’s effects on living creatures. Influences are from real discoveries made within our environment.     L15024114GrierL01

Photo Credit: Jordan Blackburn


Sovereign Nation: Paths of Resistance and Decolonization

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2014/ July 8-27/ Plan B Gallery, 2180 Gottingen Street/ Halifax N.S

“This collection of over 100 zines from the Anchor Archive Zine Library has been individually selected to consist common themes which pertain to issues of sovereignty and decolonization. These zines can be used as stepping stones to learn more on decolonizing practices such as dumpster diving, art making, and how to participate in active resistance. Sovereign Nation is organized and curated by collaborators Laura Grier and Laura Baker-Roberts, with support from the members and volunteers of the Anchor Archive community”.


 Aboriginalities

Created with GIMP

2014/ January 14 – 18 / Anna Leonowens Gallery, Halifax NS

http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=275096

“Aboriginalities marks the first exhibition of NSCAD Universities Aboriginal Collective. Featuring works by students Aiden G, Whitney Gould, Joey Fenkins, Jayme-Lynn Gloade and Laura Grier, This show engages the audience to consider Indigenous lived experiences through a variety of media. Through pieces that articulate morals, traditions, and current issues, these students offer perspectives that spark conversations, demonstrating that being Indigenous means being contemporary”.